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INFOGRAPHIC: Studies show ‘security fatigue’ may trigger apathy in wake of Equifax hack

By Byron V. Acohido

There is no mistaking that, by now, most consumers have at least a passing awareness of cyber threats.

Two other things also are true: All too many people fail to take simple steps to stay safer online; and individuals who become a victim of identity theft, in whatever form, tend to be baffled about what to do about it.

INFOGRAPHIC: Shaking off cyber fatigue can be tough

A new survey by …more

NEWS THIS WEEK: Kaspersky ban underway for U.S. agencies; Equifax data breach lawsuits pile up; Europe plans new agency to quell cyber threats

By Byron V. Acohido

The U.S. government moved to ban the use of a Russian brand of security software by federal agencies amid concerns the company has ties to state-sponsored cyber espionage activities. Acting Homeland Security Secretary Elaine Duke ordered that federal civilian agencies identify Kaspersky Lab software on their networks. After 90 days, unless otherwise directed, they must remove the software, on the grounds that the company has connections to the Russian government, and its software poses a security risk. The Department of …more

PODCAST: How web browsers present an attack vector useful to criminal hackers — and business rivals

By Byron V. Acohido

Web browsers continue to represent, arguably, the most wide-open attack vector at any given company.

This is because Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome, Microsoft Explorer and Apple Safari all use a basic architecture ideally suited for a threat actor to manipulate. To put it bluntly, it’s all too easy for an attacker to download malicious code onto an employee’s computer—and then use that infected machine as a foothold to probe deeper into the breached network.

Related article: How ‘software containers’ …more

PODCAST: How a daily ‘cyber hygiene’ routine can prevent a catastrophic network breach

By Byron V. Acohido

Cyber attacks don’t discriminate between small and large businesses. Despite small business owners believing they are too small to be at risk, 43 percent of cyber attacks target small businesses. Yet, only one in four small businesses are prepared for such an attack, according to a recent report by Symantec.

Related article: How ‘privileged access’ accounts can pose a major risk

Practicing effective cyber hygiene is one …more

Lawsuits to stop ‘kid spying’ could strir stronger privacy legislation

Dora the Explorer turns out to be something of a spy. And that’s a problem for many parents in the digital age.

The long-reaching arm of online advertising for children is increasingly coming under legal assault as parents seek to limit what large media companies, like Disney and Viacom, can conduct in surreptitious audience monitoring.

Viacom, whose brands include Nickelodeon, the producer of Dora, SpongeBob and other popular children TV shows, is the latest media giant to …more

ROUNDTABLE: Will massive Equifax breach be the wake up call for companies, regulators, consumers?

By Byron V. Acohido

The pain has only just begun for Equifax. Last Thursday, the giant credit bureau disclosed that hackers stole personal information for 143 million of its customers, presumably mostly Americans, but also Canadians and Europeans.

In less than 24 hours, two Oregonians, Mary McHill and Brook Reinhard, filed a federal class-action lawsuit accusing the Georgia-based company of failing to maintain adequate electronic security safeguards as …more

NEWS THIS WEEK: Equifax admits losing data for 143 consumers; Symantec finds dozens of U.S. power plants compromised; Trump wants hacked email lawsuit thrown out

By Byron V. Acohido

Credit-reporting agency Equifax said hackers gained access to sensitive personal data—Social Security numbers, birth dates and home addresses—for up to 143 million Americans, a major cybersecurity breach at a firm that serves as one of the three major clearinghouses for credit histories. Equifax said the breach began in May and continued until it was discovered in late July. It said hackers exploited a “website application vulnerability” and obtained personal …more